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SITEWIDE Search Results: “wellbeing”

PAST VOL 9

Glasgow @ The Lighthouse
Aug 01, 2012

PAST PechaKucha Event

Powered by PechaKucha @ Seymour Centre, Sydney
May 29, 2014

PAST VOL 8

Manchester @ Manchester Art Gallery
Dec 12, 2013

PAST VOL 17

Coventry @ The Tin Music & Arts, Canal Basin Vaults
Jul 08, 2014

PAST PechaKucha Event

Powered by PechaKucha @ Fielder Centre
Oct 15, 2015

PAST VOL 6

Gwalior @ DD Mall
Feb 19, 2017

PAST VOL 28

Sacramento @ Uptown Studios
Jul 27, 2017

PAST PechaKucha Event

Powered by PechaKucha @ International Convention Centre, Sydney
Jun 25, 2018

PAST VOL 34

New Haven @ District
Oct 17, 2018

PAST Happiness & Its Causes, Powered by PechaKucha

Powered by PechaKucha @ ICC Sydney
Jun 24, 2019

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The Fragrant City

BY TANJA SCHELL
@ VOL 29 ON FEB 29, 2016

“Smell gives us a sense of place. Our nose is our built in navigator and every city is filled with smell scapes.”

In The Fragrant City from PechaKucha Night Maastrict Volume 29, Speaker Tanja Schell shows how powerful one of our most ignored senses is. We live in a world of scents. And we are influenced by them 24/7. All those scents influence our mood and our wellbeing, all of them. Even those we are not aware of. Scent is a hidden but powerful dimension which adds a strong sense of place to the urban space, it makes cities more attractive and more safe. After ages of reducing and controlling odour emissions in the city, time has come to develop a positive policy to use this invisible power.

This was "Presentation of the Day" on May 22nd, 2017. 

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Everyday Smiles

BY ELAINE TIERNEY
@ VOL 25 ON MAY 03, 2016

Inspired by our "My Favourite Things" theme, Elaine Tierney considers what her favourite things are and realises that it is the small and everyday things that really make her happy. In this talk, she teaches us to embrace everyday smiles...small things to be happy about. She's right!

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Serious Fun

BY SUZY HARVEY
@ VOL 5 ON DEC 12, 2016

Suzy Harvey talks about her career in being a 'Fun Specialist' and how vital it is to connect, to have fun, to play and enjoy life! 

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Proving Torture

BY ROHAN JAYASEKERA
IN BEXHILL-ON-SEA

Journalist & digital start-up founder, Rohan Jayasekera makes the case for Freedom From Torture and brings our attention to International Day in Support of Victims of Torture. An emotional insight into the difficulties of surviving torture, through supporting others who have been victims of torture. 

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Creativity and Play as Medicine

BY ANNA ATKINSON
IN BEXHILL-ON-SEA

Transpersonal Arts Counsellor Anna Atkinson’s practice incorporates art, movement, creative writing, voice and body work. She explores the potential of creativity to impact on health and wellbeing. Anna gives the audience an insight into the true happiness the freedom that art can give to those who are willing to embrace it. 

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Sundalah Celebrates a Decade

BY JASMINE HEALY-PAGAN
@ VOL 17 ON MAR 15, 2018

The year was 2006. I was happy to return to Townsville but there was something missing. This was why I created Sundalah.

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Aggieland Pets with a Purpose

BY KIT DARLING
@ VOL 15 ON JUN 05, 2018

Kit Darling talks about how her organization's trained pets share their unconditional love to enhance the physical, social and emotional well-being of members of their community. Aggieland Pets With A Purpose is a non-profit volunteer organization.

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It's Happening Here

BY LOUISE MERRIMAN
@ VOL 23 ON JUL 11, 2018

Louise Merriman, bowling ball enthusiast and board member of Hope Rising, the first residential treatment center in Maine for trafficked women, speaks about what's happening before our very own eyes in her small community in southern Maine.

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Eggtooth - Hatching Potential

BY SALLY GREIG
@ VOL 11 ON SEP 06, 2018

Events throughout Sally Greig's life have shaped her to become a truly inspirational creative mentor and leader in the creative education sector. In this moving presentation, she describes the origins and objectives of The Eggtooth Project - a creative education organization which offers life-changing courses for children, young people, and adults.

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Sunsets from my musical travels

BY JOEL WHITE
@ VOL 14 ON SEP 19, 2019

Joel White collects sunsets. They have helped him through stressful times and connect memories of travels gigging across the UK and beyond as his career as a musician grows.

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Reflecting on Why We Walk

On a snowy night in mid-January, the auditorium at the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre (PWNHC) filled with Yellowknife residents clad in mukluks and goose-down parkas. The 80-odd people were gathered for Why We Walk: A PechaKucha Night devoted to exploring some of the many motivations behind the human proclivity for putting one foot in front of the other. The Yellowknife PechaKucha Night was inspired by Walk to Tuk, a winter walking challenge hosted by the NWT Recreation and Parks Association (NWTRPA). During the months of January and February, registered teams of NWT residents work together to conceptually walk the distance of the Deh Cho (Mackenzie River), 1,658 km from Fort Providence at the outlet of Great Slave Lake to Tuktoyaktuk on the Arctic Ocean. As those in attendance hunted for a seat (much to the organizers’ delight, more chairs had to be added!) and got caught up with neighbours, they were treated to songs from Jonathan Churcher’s recently released album, Rock Walker Blues. Shortly after 7pm, the MC for the night, the affable Minister of Education, Culture, and Employment, Alfred Moses, took the stage to introduce the eclectic group of presenters. There were nine presentations exploring walking from a variety of different angles. Tour guide Rosie Strong introduced the audience to the Old Town Soundwalk, an audio tour app that shares the stories, music, and colourful history of Yellowknife’s oldest neighbourhoods. In a presentation titled “The Art of Walking,” chiropractor Michael Bokor explored what is happening in our feet, legs, and knees when we go out for a ramble. Inveterate adventurers Leanne Robinson and Dwayne Wohlgemuth explored the risks and rewards of two month-long walks they have undertaken in the NWT, the first along the Arctic Coast and the second through the Mackenzie Mountains. Traditional artist Gerri Sharpe took the audience behind the scenes of the Yellowknife stop of Walking with Our Sisters, a commemorative art installation that honours the lives of missing and murdered Indigenous women. Historian and NWTRPA staff member Jess Dunkin brought to life the six-day walking competitions that drew large crowds to places like Madison Square Garden in New York City in the late nineteenth century. Colinda Blondin, a youth officer from Behchokǫ̀, and Allice Legat, a Yellowknife author and anthropologist, explored how walking ties people to place from Scotland to Denendeh in a presentation titled, “Know Where You’re From, Know Where You Live.” Photographer Jennifer Broadbridge spoke about the joys and challenges of living without a car since 2009. Elaine Stewart, Karen Wilford, Lorne Gushue, and Peter Chynoweth of Yellowknife United Church introduced audience members to labyrinth walking, a form of prayer/meditation that originated in pre-Christian times. The evening ended with biologist-turned-author Jamie Bastedo reading an excerpt from his novel Tracking Triple Seven that follows a collared bear as she travels across the barrenlands with her cubs. For all of the evening’s variety (as one audience member noted, there really was something for everyone), there were also common themes. Perhaps the most recurrent was that of connection. Walking, the different presenters made clear, connects us to our bodies; to the places we walk, both urban and wild; to others, from family and friends to neighbours and strangers; and to the Creator. Following on this, walking is: a way to tend to our physical and mental wellbeing; a vehicle for strengthening relationships and building community; an ethical choice; a way to know the past and present of the places where we are from or where we find ourselves; and a spiritual practice. It was not just the presenters who told stories about walking, the audience was also asked to share their motivations for walking on a large wooden display board. Here are a few of their responses: I walk to get where I need to go. I walk to make life decisions. I walk to get to high places. I walk so my dog won’t poop indoors. I walk for the environment. You can read more walking motivations and contribute your own on Twitter using the hashtag #whywewalk. Thank you to the presenters for your thoughtful, engaging, and entertaining contributions to the evening’s conversation about walking and to the audience members for your interest, enthusiasm, and graciousness. If you were unable to attend the PechaKucha, you can watch the presentations here. A big thank you to Rajiv Rawat at the Museum for his technical expertise. This post is also available on the NWT Recreation and Parks Association website.

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The Fragrant City

“Smell gives us a sense of place. Our nose is our built in navigator and every city is filled with smell scapes.” In The Fragrant City from PechaKucha Night Maastrict Volume 29, Speaker Tanja Schell shows how powerful one of our most ignored senses is. We live in a world of scents. And we are influenced by them 24/7. All those scents influence our mood and our wellbeing, all of them. Even those we are not aware of. Scent is a hidden but powerful dimension which adds a strong sense of place to the urban space, it makes cities more attractive and more safe. After ages of reducing and controlling odour emissions in the city, time has come to develop a positive policy to use this invisible power.

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YK Food Matters: A Recap

Another season, another PechaKucha, this one about food. It was appropriate that this event fell during autumn, a time of harvesting and preparing food for the long winter. YK Food Matters was a collaboration between the Yellowknife Farmers Market, the NWT Recreation and Parks Association, and the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre. We received support from the GNWT Department of Industry, Tourism, and Investment. The title of the evening’s event, YK Food Matters, was meant to highlight the biological, social, and cultural import of food. Food matters to our health and wellbeing, as individuals and as a community. The title was also a reminder of the environmental, cultural, economic, political, and social aspects of how we gather, produce, process, distribute, consume, and dispose of food, or “food matters.” We used the idea of the food system to organize the evening’s presentations. A food system is the path that food travels from the land to our plates and beyond. It includes the growing, harvesting, processing, packaging, transporting, distributing, marketing, consuming, and disposing of food. It also includes the inputs and outputs of each step, including labour, equipment, fuel, and waste. The graphic below is one way to represent a food system. [Graphic Credit: Nourish (www.nourishlife.org).] Food systems, as this image illustrates, are multi-faceted and complex. There is no way we could cover every part of the food system in one night. Rather YK Food Matters was intended as a sampling of different components of the food system, a tapas PechaKucha, so to speak. Shortly after 7, Master of Ceremonies Mark Hyeck introduced the first speaker, Tracey Williams, and we were off! In her presentation entitled “Food Charter and Food Security, Making the Connections,” Tracey introduced the audience to the Yellowknife Food Charter. A food charter is a document developed by community members and endorsed by decision makers that articulates a local vision for a just and sustainable food system. In explaining the origins of Yellowknife’s food charter, Tracey also fleshed out the idea of a food system and food security. In “Decolonizing Consumption,” Peyton Straker described her apprenticeship as a hunter and the lessons she learned as she butchered and shared the meat. She also talked about the different ways in which she uses the animals and plants she harvests: dry fish, moose hides, muskox jewellry, and spruce gum salve, to name just a few. Peyton’s presentation shed light on the harvesting of animals, plants, and medicines as acts of food security and decolonization. If you were at the final Farmers Market in September, you may have picked up some swiss chard or potatoes from the Northern Farm Training Institute’s stall. Based in Hay River, NFTI supports the creation of local agricultural experts through in-depth hands-on learning experiences in “living classrooms.” This evening’s presentation about NFTI was to be delivered by organization president, Jackie Milne. Unfortunately, Jackie was unable to attend. France Benoit kindly stepped in to take her place. Entitled “Restoring Vitality Through Restoration Agriculture,” the NFTI presentation explored how growing plants and raising animals in a good way, or restorative agriculture, can heal people, communities, and the land. Restorative agriculture “produces food that comes from a healthy, diverse, abundant ecosystem.” It is a realistic alternative to the industrial food system that supports food sovereignty and security in the North. The fourth speaker, Maxime Carpentier,was recently hired as the Food Service Manager at Avens. Maxime believes strongly in the importance of good quality food and his commitment is changing how residents at Avens eat. Maxime shared how he is making it a priority to source local food from Great Slave Lake whitefish to Yellowknife-grown tomatos to barrenland caribou. He is also experimenting with different preparations, such as smoking, and new recipes, to ensure that elders receive the food they know and love. Maxime’s presentation, “Little Changes, Better Quality!,” revealed how individuals and organizations can make sourcing decisions, which support local producers and are economically sound, not to mention delicious! The evening continued on the theme of eating well with a presentation by Amy Lam, a lover of cooking and eating and a food photographer. In her presentation, “Northern Fancy Eats,” Amy described her Northern food journey from her earliest impression that Yellowknife was a food desert to her current passion for the rich and diverse food cultures of the NWT capital. Along the way, Amy participated in a NFTI course, tried her hand at growing, worked with the Farmers Market, diversified her cooking repertoire, and took some beautiful photos. Food, to this point in the evening, had been described as sustenance, political, cultural, and pleasureable. The sixth speaker, Dr. Kyla Wright, a naturopathic doctor practicing at Gaia Integrative Clinic, demonstrated how food can also be medicine.Kyla’s presentation, titled “Food as Medicine in the 21st Century,” highlighted some of the problems with the industrial food system, such as the widespread use of sugar and the enormous distances that separate field from plate. The focus, however, was on the delicious and healthy foods that are close at hand for Yellowknife residents from trout to wild rose petals to dandelion root to chaga. In 2014, Yellowknife’s Food Rescue diverted 14,000 kg of food waste, putting it in the hands and bellies of those in need. Grocery stores and mining camps donate items each day that have passed their best before date or are bruised, damaged, or broken. A team of 30-odd volunteers and a part-time paid driver then sort, process, repackage, and redistribute the food to schools and local organizations like the Centre for Northern Families and the Salvation Army. Mona Durkee’s presentation, “Food Waste: From Rejection to 'a Peeling,’” revealed how Food Rescue is transforming the local food system, one bruised banana at a time. The final speaker of the evening was Yellowknife’s Sustainability Coordinator, Chris Vaughn. Chris’ presentation, entitled “Organics Recycling in the North,” shed light on opportunities and challenges related to waste management in the Yellowknife. It also took the audience behind the scenes at the city’s compost facility. A key message from Chris’s presentation was that while waste diversion is important, waste reduction should be our primary goal. In addition to eight amazingly interesting, informative, and funny stories about food in Yellowknife, the event featured a pop-up exhibit about Yellowknife food, past and present. There were photographs from the NWT Archives depicting moose hunts, market gardens, and food waste, as well as displays on northern food models, creative canning, the Yellowknife Food Charter, and local food sourcing at Co-op. Keep an eye out for the fourth and final PechaKucha Night of 2016: #LovetheLand, which will take place on Thursday, December 8. Did you miss YK Food Matters? Don't despair. We recorded the presentations. They are available here.  

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The Fragrant City

 Tanja Schell shows how powerful one of our most ignored senses is. We live in a world of scents. And we are influenced by them 24/7. All those scents influence our mood and our wellbeing, all of them. Even those we are not aware of. Scent is a hidden but powerful dimension which adds a strong sense of place to the urban space, it makes cities more attractive and more safe. After ages of reducing and controlling odour emissions in the city, time has come to develop a positive policy to use this invisible power.