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SITEWIDE Search Results: “mapping”

PAST VOL 3

Delhi @ British Council
May 10, 2007

PAST VOL 13

Istanbul @ Yapı-Endüstri Merkezi A.Ş.
Feb 23, 2012

PAST VOL 11

Hong Kong @ Fabrik Gallery
Apr 24, 2012

PAST VOL 38

Auckland @ Alleluya Café //St. Kevins Arcade
Nov 28, 2013

PAST VOL 23

Honolulu @ Honolulu Museum of Art School
Apr 10, 2015

PAST VOL 2

Yellowknife @ Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre
May 26, 2016

PAST VOL 22

Madison, WI @ Monona Terrace Community & Convention Center
Apr 13, 2017

PAST VOL 5

Galashiels @ Mac Arts
Nov 18, 2017

PAST VOL 28

Waterville @ Waterville Opera House
Jul 12, 2018

PAST VOL 3

Stirling @ CodeBase Stirling
Sep 06, 2018

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The Maker Addict Movement

BY LIZ NEELY
@ VOL 25 ON MAR 05, 2013

Liz Neely is a maker addict. She creates things that have no purpose; only to see if she could make something out of her own imagination. She does not believe in the impossible and therefore challenges others to thing freely and create because no matter the lack of experience you may have nor how impossioble it may seem, it can be made. 

 

 

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Shaping Space and Realities

BY LAUREN SLOWIK
@ VOL 4 ON MAY 18, 2015

"What I find funny is the idea that doomsday preppers think they can inoculate themselves from effects of an apocalypse by collecting things we have manufactured in the last 100 years to protect themselves from the future, but in fact what we need more are tools and solutions to overcome the quandary that the demise of our species is at our own hands."

In Shaping Space and Realities from PechaKucha Night Brooklyn Vol. 4, self-proclaimed design evangelist, educator, and promoter of play Lauren Slowik explores the infinite possibilities of shaping space and realities with advancing 3-d printing technology to create new physical connections. Join her as she goes deep into the rabbit hole of how our future can be reimagined with a shift in thinking. 

This was "Presentation of the Day" on Thursday, September 10th, 2015. 

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Connecting the Dots between Teaching, Learning, and Making in California and Japan

BY MAI RYUNO
@ VOL 9 ON MAR 24, 2016

Artist and educator Mai Ryuno shares stories from her life and projects in the US and Japan. She creates community experiences in her classroom, and finds ways to engage students in developing their conceptual and artistic capabilities.

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Spatial Memory Mapping

BY LYLA CATELLIER
@ VOL 8 ON MAR 04, 2016

Lyla Catellier gives good directions! At PechaKucha Night Brooklyn Volume 8, Lyla put her 7 siblings to the test - a test of spatial memory mapping. With 5/7 siblings worth of maps of her hometown, Lyla explores the wonders of the hippocampus.

Lyla is a lady living in Chelsea NYC. She currently directs public programs and events at Columbia University GSAPP and was once called a swiss army knife. She is a logistics maverick, and has always wanted someone to refer to her as a maverick, and at PK Brooklyn Volume 8, we did!

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The Future of Flooding

BY SAMUEL BUDIN
@ VOL 16 ON SEP 01, 2016

Samuel Lang Budin is a social documentary photographer living in Brooklyn and working primarily in the depressive realist mode. He makes 35mm and medium format slide shows about climate change anxiety, aging and death, naked people in their own homes, the personal discomforts of travel, and the encroaching sea. Just you wait!

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Building Black Utopias: Modeling the Architectural Principles of African American Literature, 1960-1975

BY CHARLES L. DAVIS, II, PH.D.
@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

"We started with several books that looked at the brownstone as a site of intervention."

In Building Black Utopias: Modeling the Architectural Principles of African American Literature, 1960-1975 from PechaKucha Buffalo vol. 17, Charles L. Davis, II, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Architecture at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, shows works from his recent exhibition project, Building Black Utopias, and discusses the literature that served as inspiration. 

The Building Black Utopias project combines the tools of the architect, the historian and the literary critic to recover the historical contributions of African American writers to architectural utopian thought. It specifically examines the role of literary depictions of place in June Jordan, Amiri Baraka, Paule Marshall and Angela Davis’ writings. Davis argues that each authors’ rhetorical manipulations of the built environment operates on the same level as architectural utopian thought insofar as both mediums created rich, alternative depictions of modernist space to liberate the architect’s imagination. The final exhibit translates the spatial ideas of literature into drawings, models and other ephemera.

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Architecture + Education

BY BETH TAUKE
@ VOL 18 ON SEP 24, 2016

"These kids have big ideas and only through making do those ideas come alive."

In Architecture + Education from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 18, Associate Professor at the University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning, Beth Tauke, joined by graduate student Randy Fernando, we learn about the Architecture + Education program. This initiative of the Buffalo Architecture Foundation and the University at Buffalo earned the 2013 AIA Diversity Recognition Program award for introducing thousands of grade-schoolers to architecture over the past 13 years. Faculty and students work with practitioners in the Buffalo Public School system to introduce students to the idea of architecture, concepts in the practice, and career possibilities. The program's motto, adapted from Dr. Seuss, is true to its mission: "Think LEFT & think RIGHT & think LOW & think HIGH. Oh, the things you can come up with if only you try!"

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Mermaid's Coin

BY HANNAH KATARSKI
@ VOL 22 ON JUL 26, 2018

(Apologies for no audio) 

Through Mermaid’s Coin, I combine my two passions, surfing and making, to create limited edition artworks and objects evocative of the beach, ocean and surf culture. It is a one-woman, Fremantle-based business creating ‘surf art’ that is vibrant, retro and fun.

I have always been a maker. When travelling around the world in 2010 on a 'surfari', I was inspired by artists in California and Hawaii, who use their medium to express their love of, and relationship with the ocean.

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Ferocious Weasels and Hans Holbein

BY CAMERON PFIFFNER
@ VOL 47 ON SEP 19, 2018

Artist Cameron Pfiffner enlightens on a variety of subjects including chalk, marble dust, Holbein ferocious weasels, Santana album covers and a little fuzziness.

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Good Waste

BY EWAN ALSTON
@ VOL 37 ON JUN 12, 2019

Ewan Alston is a designer and maker specialising in material ows and the circular economy. He is currently completing an MA in Design Products at the Royal College of Art, where his work has focussed on the production systems that de ne products and their footprint, and on how cities can move towards local, circular manufacturing.
Recent projects include furniture made from waste marble from an industrial site, designed for the neighbouring housing development; and a series of lamp designs that would automatically adapt to whatever metal offcuts are locally available at a given moment.
ewanalston.com / @ewan.alston

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Projecting Illuminated Art

It looks as though the Blade Runner methods of projection have come early. In today's Presentation of the Day, "Projecting Illuminated Art" from PKN Blue Mountains Vol. 2, Cindi Drennan shows off some of her stunning work utilizing projection mapping technology to transform theaters, galleries, and even iconic buildings into giant, moving murals. She also goes into depth on the community of artists and businesses that she's worked to build over the course of her career.

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PKN Santa Fe in the News

Santa Fe just recently launched its own PechaKucha Night series, and here's a great report from the Santa Fe New Mexican. Rubart recruited Wednesday’s eight presenters through cold-calling and word of mouth. The presentations were mostly arts-oriented, with a bit of technology and economic development thrown into the mix. Wednesday’s speakers were Marina de Palma, a poet and book designer; Zane Fischer, co-coordinator of MIXSantaFe; Tori Hughes, an artist and creative coach; Joanne Lefrak, director of outreach and education at SITE Santa Fe; Dienke Nauta, a visual artist; Gail Snowdon, a photographer; Katelyn Peer, a project coordinator at the nonprofit Creative Santa Fe; and Pete Kelsey, the founder of Adventures in Rediscovery, a company that does 3-D mapping of natural environments and historic sites. Read the full article here.

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How to Make the World Work for 11 Billion People

"The world's population will reach more than 11 billion by the end of this century." Maria Aialova is the co-founder of Terreform ONE, a think-tank which focuses on mapping population density. With 11 billion people on the Earth, and 3/4 of the population living in cities, a redistribution of energy will be absolutely paramount. In "Making the World Work for 11 Billion People" from PKN New York Vol. 14, Maria states that we must shift from competition to cooperation and from ownership to membership in order to live successfully. 

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Be Someone's Hero

Every government keeps criminal records, but why don't we keep records of goodness? An expert in creative leadership, Stephie Knopel lends her expertise to invent a new way to say thank you. With her web app creation, Personal Heroes, users are able to thank strangers for random acts of kindness. In "Be Someone's Hero" from PKN Tokyo Vol. 114, we see that the app also allows users to geotag their heroes, mapping our world in a different way -- with an index of good, rather than bad.

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Rap Mapping and the Everyday

“We touched on the Dirty South, civil rights, regionalism, and rawness.” Professor Liz Teston speaks about her design research project that focuses on regional rap music factions. In “Rap Mapping and the Everyday” from PKN Knoxville Vol. 12 she discusses the rap culture in the Dirty South and its connection to the built environment of this locale.

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Mata is Meta-Data: Mapping the Anthropolithic Age

"Its an ancient god, being awakened, being uploaded, being digitized...along with all the other worldly mythologies." In Mata is Meta-Data: Mapping the Anthropolithic Age from Honolulu Vol. 23 artist Solomon Enos, known for his "Epic Tales of Hi`iakaikapoliopele" interpreted as large scale murals and installations, passionately shares his most recent project, “Polyfantastica”, where evil corporations are personified as grotesque monsters in tales of battles of good over evil. The work is a continuation of his life-long project called “Mata” in which he hopes may unify all the global mythologies and theologies into the final human narrative, hosted as an international public game for children. This is some next level imagination! 

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My New Everyday Life

“Obviously, living in a wheelchair is a challenge but is a normal life for many. Wheelchair living requires constant mapping out of acceptable routes and services –like bathrooms– and destinations –like restaurants.” In My New Everyday Life Speaker Nora Ames reprises her standing ovation presentation from the Chicago Architecture Biennial at PechaKucha Chicago’s 36th Volume.   Nora used to enjoy runs by Lake Michigan, running by herself or with coworkers and friends. 13 months ago she had a medical condition taking her out of the workplace and changing her perspective forever. In this presentation the effect of design on accessibility is discussed.

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PKN 2 in Vientiane!

Vientiane's second PechaKucha Night took place on March 31, 2016, with more than 120 people coming together upstairs at Coco&Co.! Vintage furniture, chandleirs, and a crazy cat pillow - thank you Coco for letting us invade the coolest living room in Vientiane! The event brought together nine of the Capital's creative, innovative and talented minds: social media photographer Janna Gibson, avid mapper Matthias Bethke, documentary maker and journalist Vannaphone Sitthirath (Kino), photographer Tessa Bunney, theatre director Margarete Magiera, publishing manager Dominique le Roux, designer and cafe owner Nilada Ratanavong, cafe owner Yoko Matsushima, and photographer Micka Perier, to share their ideas with the community. Presentations spanned personal essays and life-shaping experiences, a culmination of 15 years of portrait photography, a spoken word performance, coffee as a means of communication, agriculture and mapping, a theatrical journey, and asking ourselves if we have a book in us. Many thanks to the Vientiane community for coming down and supporting our 9 fantastic speakers - along with our supporters Coco & Co Cafe, TOH LAO Coworking Space & Services, and of course our wonderful Vol. 2 poster designer Vilakone Phachanthavong! Here's a few snaps from the event! Photos by Kate Antonas, and Nao Ito when noted.   Janna Gibson presenting '#RealLaosProject' Yoko Matsushima presenting 'Laos, Coffee and the Little House' Nilada Ratanavong presenting 'Observations of Beautiful Forms' Micka Pereir presenting his visual essay.    Photo by Nao Ito.  Vol. 2 speakers (L-R): Janna Gibson, Margarete Magiera, Micka Perier, Vannaphone Sitthirath, Yoko Matsushima, Tessa Bunney, Nilada Ratanavong, Matthias Bethke, and Dominique le Roux.     

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Re-Thinking Maps and Mapping

By Jess Dunkin, On the Land Programs Consultant, NWT Recreation and Parks Association In late May, the NWT Recreation and Parks Association (NWTRPA) and the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre (PWNHC) co-hosted the second of four PechaKucha Nights slated to happen in Yellowknife this year. The theme of this evening was Maps and Mapping, a topic which clearly resonated with Yellowknifers, as once again we had to add seats at the last minute! You can read about the first PechaKucha here. Maps are more than tools for navigation. They are also rich historical and cultural objects that tell us something about how we see the world. This makes them ripe for analysis and reflection, a fact that was amply demonstrated by the evening’s six presenters. MC Mike Mitchell introducing the evening (Photo: NWTRPA) The PechaKucha opened with a funny and thoughtful introduction by the snappily dressed MC for the evening Mike Mitchell. With a hand full of well-worn maps from his travels in British Columbia, South America, and the NWT, Mike demonstrated how maps remind us of journeys taken, people encountered, and experiences had. The first presenter was Yellowknife-based photographer Fran Hurcomb, who spent her 6 minutes and 40 seconds “unrolling” what might be the country’s longest map: a 128-foot long map of the Dehcho (Mackenzie River). After explaining how the map was used by boat captains navigating Canada’s longest river, we journeyed with Fran, her partner Dave, and their daughter from Hay River to Inuvik. This trip formed the basis for an exhibition at the museum a few years ago that linked archival photographs and her own images to points on the map. (Photo: Fran Hurcomb) The second presentation, which was delivered bySteve Schwarz, transported those gathered at the museum, from the NWT’s waterways to the skyways. Steve, a remote sensing analyst with the GNWT, demonstrated how satellite images and aerial photographs can help us to map, monitor, and better understand landscape change from forest fires in the Tłı̨chǫ to shoreline erosion on the Arctic Coast to slumps in the Gwich’in Settlement Area. Steve was followed by Rajiv Rawat, a mapmaker and media/tech specialist at the PWNHC with an almost encyclopaedic knowledge of the fantasy genre. Rajiv wowed the audience with his engaging analysis of maps and representations of the North in fantasy literature, films, and television shows. From the fourth presenter, Ingrid Kritsch, Research Director of the Gwich’in Tribal Council Department of Cultural Heritage (formerly the Gwich’in Social and Cultural Institute), we learned the story behind the Gwich’in Place Names project. Since 1992, the GTC has worked with elders and knowledge holders to gather information about named places in the Gwich’in Settlement Region. This information has formed the backbone of the Gwich’in Place Names Digital Atlas and a series of place-name maps produced by the GTC. Simon Whitehouse with the Rand McNally Geo-Physical Globe (Photo: Simon Whitehouse) Next, local journalist Simon Whitehouse reported on research he conducted while a graduate student into the history of the Rand McNally Geo-Physical Earth Globes. Long before the crew of Apollo 8 photographed the earth from space, these large globes (they measured six feet in diameter and weighed more than 400lbs!) allowed Americans to see a realistic interpretation of the world they inhabited. Simon also demonstrated how the globes captured advancements in various postwar sciences including geology, cartography, ecology, and space science. The evening’s final presenter was Tom Andrews. Before he accepted a position as an archaeologist with the GNWT, Tom worked for the Dene Nation on the Dene Mapping Project, a traditional land use and occupancy survey of Denendeh. The project team worked with 600 Dene and Metis trappers to document their land use on large maps. What is less well-know about the project is the long and tedious process of computerizing the information gathered during the many interviews, something that become abundantly clear during after Tom’s presentation. The Mapping Project has inspired and furnished data for other regional mapping project including the Sahtu Atlas and the aforementioned Gwich’in Place Names Atlas. Pop-up exhibit on maps and mapping (Photo: NWTRPA) In addition to the six presentations, the night featured a pop-up exhibit about maps and mapping that included a map roller used on board the CCGS Tembah, panels from the Gwich’in Place Names project, Bonnie Fournier’s art maps, and information about a mapping project graduate student Amanda DeGray is undertaking with the Yellowkives Dene. Bonnie Fournier with her art maps (Photo: NWTRPA) Arctic Tern furnished the presenters with maps as thanks for all of their hardwork. If you missed the event, some of the presentations are available here.

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The Debatable Lands

"You can see how there is an emotional tie to the land and for a lot of people the idea of having a much more solid border going through their landscape was quite a horrific thought." In The Debatable Lands from PechaKucha Night Galashiels Vol. 5, Zoe Childerley discusses The Debatable Lands of the Anglo-Scots border through photography and mapping based on her artist-in-residency at VARC in Northumberland in 2016.