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SITEWIDE Search Results: “decolonize”

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Racial Justice and the Climate Crisis

BY BILL GALLEGOS
@ VOL 13 ON APR 30, 2015

With over three decades of organizing experience with unions, students, and grassroots organizations, activist-in-residence at Havens Center for Social Justice, Bill Gallegos discusses the complexities of climate change's affect on racial justice. He shares his some of his experiences in achieving environmental programs that ensure low-income communities and communities of color receive the health, environmental, and economic benefits of sound environmental policy.

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Building Black Utopias: Modeling the Architectural Principles of African American Literature, 1960-1975

BY CHARLES L. DAVIS, II, PH.D.
@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

"We started with several books that looked at the brownstone as a site of intervention."

In Building Black Utopias: Modeling the Architectural Principles of African American Literature, 1960-1975 from PechaKucha Buffalo vol. 17, Charles L. Davis, II, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Architecture at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, shows works from his recent exhibition project, Building Black Utopias, and discusses the literature that served as inspiration. 

The Building Black Utopias project combines the tools of the architect, the historian and the literary critic to recover the historical contributions of African American writers to architectural utopian thought. It specifically examines the role of literary depictions of place in June Jordan, Amiri Baraka, Paule Marshall and Angela Davis’ writings. Davis argues that each authors’ rhetorical manipulations of the built environment operates on the same level as architectural utopian thought insofar as both mediums created rich, alternative depictions of modernist space to liberate the architect’s imagination. The final exhibit translates the spatial ideas of literature into drawings, models and other ephemera.

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Decolonising our Places

BY REBECCA KIDDLE
@ VOL 34 ON MAR 05, 2018

“Colonisation is just a bit shit.”  Rebecca Kiddle shares some of the lessons of her research which focuses on Aotearoa place identity and placemaking, decolonising cities and the design of community and educational space.

Rebecca is Ngāti Porou and Ngā Puhi. She is a Senior Lecturer, Environmental Studies, Victoria University of Wellington.

She has worked in the urban design space in the UK, China and Aotearoa New Zealand for the past seven years having undertaken a PhD and MA in urban design at Oxford Brookes University, UK. Prior to this she worked in housing and Māori development policy and as Private Secretary Housing for the Associate Minister of Housing (Māori housing portfolio) in New Zealand’s parliament.

She is currently the co-chair Pōneke for Ngā Aho: Network of Māori Designers, a member of Papa Pounamu: New Zealand Planning Institute and a panel member of the Auckland Urban Design Panel. Her research focuses on Aotearoa New Zealand place identity and placemaking, decolonising cities and the design of community and educational space. Most recently she won Marsden funding for the topic: Making Aotearoa Places: The Politics and Practice of Urban Māori Place-making