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Stem Cell Art

BY IRWIN ADAM EYDELNANT
@ VOL 14 ON MAR 27, 2012

Irwin Adam is a chemical engineer, but all of his friends are designers. After a crazy journey through Siberia, he moved to Toronto from Montreal. Inspired by his designer friends, he's turning 2D stem cells into microscopic 3D art.

"Presentation of the Day" on July 27, 2013.

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A Boyhood through Breakfast Cereals

BY TOM BARWOOD
@ VOL 3 ON NOV 06, 2014

Tom Barwood romps through his boyhood and youth using breakfast cereals as socials markers. Breakfast is the best meal of the day, and the early morning meal the creates memories for many childhoods. With which cereals they hate or love. Which ones make you think of Saturday mornings, or the ones that remind you of that important day at school or baseball game.

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Stem Cell Donation: Match in a Million

BY SOON-OK HEIJMANS
@ VOL 3 ON SEP 19, 2015

Soon-ok Heijmans, a researcher on Asian affairs and a leukemia survivor, tells about the miracle of finding one's match in a million through stemcell donation.

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He Plays the Cello for the Mafia

BY TAYLOR FAUSSET
@ VOL 9 ON JUN 21, 2016

Taylor Fausset was the lead man and vocals in this, but there was a total of four musicians involved in performing this unique piece. 

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Complicating Things: Experimenting with Authority

BY PAUL VANOUSE
@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

“I’m a bio media artist. And what that means is I work self-reflexively, with the tools and technologies of the life sciences.” 

In Complicating Things: Experimenting with Authority from PechaKucha Buffalo vol. 17, Professor of Art at the University at Buffalo, Paul Vanouse, provides an overview of his work as a bio media artist. As Director of the newly created Coalesce Center for Biological Art at the University at Buffalo, Vanouse works with artists and philosophers and people who wouldn’t normally have a direct connection to do create work in a life sciences laboratory, and is actively engaged with Coalesce’s artist residency program. Vanouse’s own work has recently focused on DNA fingerprinting, removing the inherent layers of authority from DNA with an interest in the very visual representation of DNA. His recent projects, Latent Figure Protocol and Ocular Revision use molecular biology techniques to challenge “genome-hype” and to confront issues surrounding DNA fingerprinting. 

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The Art of Biology

BY MEHDI DOUMI
@ VOL 17 ON MAR 09, 2017

Mehdi Doumi is from Algeria and England, studied biomedical engineering, and is a technical leader in Research and Innovation at L’Oreal USA - researching human perception of cosmetic products.  He has been part of NPO Ligo Project, promoting science in U.S. culture through humor and videography.  He also enjoys carpentry, improv, and drawing satirical cartoons.  Over the last 4 years he has committed himself to creating abstract artwork to any K-12 educator across the USA.  He hopes that each art piece stimulates student curiosity about math and science topics, especially in a challenging teaching environment.

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It All Makes Cents

BY CHRISTINEA BEANE
@ VOL 25 ON NOV 16, 2017

Christinea Beane was once accused of stepping over a dollar to pick up a penny. This was intended to be an insult, suggesting that she only cares about the little things, or things that do not matter to other people. However, Christinea saw this as an opportunity.
 
Christinea believes that a penny is a metaphor for everything in life, and like you, every penny has its story. That story should be heard. While she is connecting with people as a sales representative for a Nashville based brewery, Christinea is collecting stories as inspiration and for the jewelry that she creates.
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Advances in Stem Cell Therapies

BY GREG PALKOWSKI
@ VOL 36 ON SEP 13, 2018

Dr. Gregory Palkowski has practiced in Beavercreek, OH for over 35 years. He is the Clinic Director of a multidisciplinary, group practice that specializes in Physical Medicine, Weight Loss and Regenerative Medicine. He has been married for almost 40 years, two adult children, and three grandchildren.

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The Organoid Factory

BY PETER PETERS
@ VOL 37 ON JAN 23, 2019

The nanobiologist and university professor Peter Peters tells us about a completely new method to cure cancer. He and his team at Maastricht University will make massively tiny organs (or organoids) from healthy and malignant cells and test them on different drugs to find the best drug cocktail for the cancer patient.

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How a Cell Saved My LIfe

BY JUSTIN THOMAS
@ VOL 123 ON JUL 31, 2019

Justin Thomas is a man that is full of zest that he once lost. Once, he was determined to be an up and coming hip hop director or NBA director. Now he did a complete 360 and is passionate about serving the community that changed his life, and helped him turn tragedy into triumph!

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Stem Cell Art, Bridging Community and Students Through Art, and the Story Behind a Poster

Presentations Irwin Adam is a chemical engineer, but all of his friends are designers. As you'll see in his presentation (from PKN Toronto Vol. 10), after a crazy journey through Siberia, he moved to Toronto from Montreal. Inspired by his designer friends, he's turning 2D stem cells into 3D "art." In his presentation (from PKN Dallas Vol. 10), Bernardo Diaz describes the program he developed to connect his students with some of the city's community centers. Posters Instead of adding a new poster to the Tumblr blog today, we share the story behind the making of Springfield, MO's poster for its upcoming Vol. 8, produced by organizer Pam Rubert.Since we are hosting this event at our studio on our lonely industrial street, I drew our streetscape for the poster. When the full moon rises over our street, I sometimes think that my husband's aluminum sculpture is reaching for the moon. When I look out of my office window, I can sometimes see a family of groundhogs that have made a home underground. Every day they are throwing more dirt and rocks out of the hole, so the tunnels must be getting bigger and more complex. I imagined PechaKucha Night Vol. 8 as sort of an underground network of a variety of people and creatures.Below, the groundhogs in question: Photos Here's a photo gallery [Flickr] for the recent PKN Norrkoping Vol. 20, held earlier this month. Please note that the dates for Vol. 21 and Vol. 22 have already been announced, and are set for November 6 and December 4 respectively. Calendar We kick off the weekend with these events tonight (October 26): PKN Orlando Vol. 7, PKN Bern Vol. 19, PKN Waterville Vol. 9, PKN Koszalin Vol. 10, PKN Wellington Vol. 17, PKN Cagliari Vol. 4, and PKN Castellon de la Plana Vol. 2. On Saturday, you'll find PKN Lodz Vol. 9.

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Stem Cell Art

Irwin Adam Eydelnant is a chemical engineer, but all of his friends are designers. In his edition of Presentation of the Day, "Stem Cell Art" (from PKN Toronto Vol. 14), he speaks on how he moved to Toronto from Montreal after a crazy, transformative journey through Siberia. Inspired by his designer friends, and armed with his newfound inspiration, he began turning stem cells into microscopic 3D art.

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3D Printing Biology

In today's Presentation of the Day, "3D Printing Biology" from PKN Miami Vol. 26, we hear from Corrie Van Sice, who works at the intersection of design, engineering, and biology. Corrie has used 3D-printing technology to engineer proto-cells (structures that look like real cells -- they include a nucleus and cell walls -- but not made from anything living).  She speaks on the under-discussed dilemma of "innovation" run amok and posits that if more scientists were to operate like artists (in that they could explore their studies without university or corporate control), development in their field might take new and exciting direction.