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SITEWIDE Search Results: “accessibility”

PAST VOL 13

Dundee @ Bonar Hall
Nov 10, 2015

PAST VOL 9

Nairobi @ Creatives Garage
Apr 16, 2016

PAST VOL 12

Markham @ Markham Village Library
Sep 30, 2016

PAST VOL 16

Markham @ Markham Village Library
Sep 29, 2017

PAST VOL 20

Markham @ Markham Village Library
Sep 28, 2018

PAST VOL 36

Christchurch @ Warren and Mahoney Office
Sep 17, 2018

PAST VOL 15

Victoria @ Baumann Centre - Pacific Opera
Sep 08, 2018

PAST The 400-second Pitch Party by Arts and Health Niagara, Powered by PechaKucha

Powered by PechaKucha @ Room MW247, Marilyn I. Walker School of Fine and Performing Arts, Brock University
May 11, 2019

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Geeks for Good

BY CHAD LEAMAN
@ VOL 1 ON JAN 24, 2013

Chad Leaman tells us how modern conveniences, unconventional user interfaces, and unique innovations have been used in the past and present to help people with disabilities carry on with their lives. He looks to the future of these applications, and urges people to help in whatever way they can.

 "Presentation of the Day" on May 30, 2013.
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Inclusive Design

BY AMY POTHIER
@ VOL 26 ON SEP 27, 2013

Amy Pothier and Jesse Klimitz of Quadrangle Architects want to inspire action in all designers to “Get Better” by designing fully inclusive and accommodating spaces for everyone, regardless of age or ability, to enjoy and experience. Accessible design does not need to be clinical and ugly when accommodating the 1 in 7 persons in Canada that live with some form of a visible or non-visible disability.

"Presentation of the Day" on January 14, 2014.

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Trust in Violent Times

BY ANTOINE PÉROUZE
@ VOL 32 ON NOV 05, 2013

Antoine Pérouze talks about the violent times we are living in and the advantages of trusting nevertheless in people to share goods, services and experiences aided by nowadays thecnology. (in Spanish)

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A Lifetime of Experiences; An Artist in the Making

BY LINDSAY PINCHBECK
@ VOL 20 ON JAN 31, 2014

Lindsay Pinchbeck is the director and founder of Sweet Tree Arts in Hope and has been teaching in the arts for 15 years. Previously she taught photography at the Riley School and the Maine Media Workshops. She is also a printmaker and photographer, and believes the arts should be accessible to all and is an integral piece of learning and personal growth.

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Internet des Objets et Environnements Intelligents Accessibles

BY GUILLAUME OLIVRIN
@ VOL 11 ON JUN 25, 2015

L’internet des objets permettrait de rendre l’environnement plus accessible, inclusif, permissif et apporterait de l’autonomie. Quelles solutions et quelles approches sont possibles pour réaliser cette promesse ? Cette réflexion s’appuie sur les conclusions et les prototypes des recherches réalisées à l’Institut Meraka du CSIR en Afrique du Sud entre 2006 et 2011.

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Wearable Technology for All

BY JENSIN ELAINE
@ VOL 6 ON OCT 19, 2015

Jensin Wallace relates her trip to Slovenia to collaborate with a man suffering from tetraplegia to create custom smart clothing to assist him on a day to day basis - all controlled by his cell phone! Wow!

Jensin was trained as textile textile designer at the Rhode Island School of Design and experimented with how to make sound and emotions tangible. After getting some experience in the luxury fashion industry, she went back to school and received a Masters of Design focusing in fashion and technology. Currently she works as a sweater technical designer for a high end women's label in NYC.

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Monday, November 9th, 2015. 

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Pro-Poor Innovation, How to Hype it with Micro Industry

BY REINDER VAN TIJEN
@ VOL 27 ON NOV 23, 2015

“Craft keeps alive a few million– a few billion people but it doesn't lift them out of poverty. You need something else; what you need is your brain and my brain, an attitude, and a change.”

In Pro-Poor Innovation, How to Hype it with Micro Industry from PechaKucha Night Maastrict’s 27th Volume, Reinder van Tijen, owner of the company Demotech discusses industry at the poverty level. In industry, one needs capital. In an environment with no capital, one needs Ingenuity. Loopholes can be found when one re-designs concepts, tools, methods, and ideas to make them accessible and affordable to everybody in the world. Tijen’s goal? To improve lives with tricks and techniques and create more joy per person.

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My New Everyday Life

BY NORA AMES
@ PECHAKUCHA NIGHT AT THE CHICAGO ARCHITECTURE BIENNIAL ON OCT 30, 2015

“Obviously, living in a wheelchair is a challenge but is a normal life for many. Wheelchair living requires constant mapping out of acceptable routes and services –like bathrooms– and destinations –like restaurants.”

In My New Everyday Life Speaker Nora Ames reprises her standing ovation presentation from the Chicago Architecture Biennial at PechaKucha Chicago’s 36th Volume.  

Nora used to enjoy runs by Lake Michigan, running by herself or with coworkers and friends. 13 months ago she had a medical condition taking her out of the workplace and changing her perspective forever. In this presentation the effect of design on accessibility is discussed.

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Monday, February 15th, 2016. 

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Hello Tiger!

BY MARTYN SIBLEY
@ VOL 19 ON MAR 20, 2019

Martyn Sibley is a regular guy who happens to have a disability called Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA). This means he cannot walk, lift anything heavier than a book or shower himself. He runs Disability Horizons, is the author of 'Everything is Possible', has a Degree in Economics & a Masters in Marketing. In this fun packed presentation, Martyn shares his love of adventure and his travels around the world.  

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Bread and Roses

BY THEO RUTHERFORD
@ VOL 39 ON SEP 05, 2019

With a background in Urban Geography, Interior Designer Theo Rutherford is interested in making urban spaces more equitable and accessible. Theo works with similar-minded architectural and interior design professionals at f-BLOK architecture, where she contributes her knowledge on what makes spaces equitable to their projects. At PechaKucha Night Winnipeg Vol. 39, Theo took the stage to talk about the connections between urban geography, interior design, and accessibility — a philosophy of sorts that she calls "Bread and Roses".

Follow Theo and f-BLOK architecture inc on social media:
Instagram: @fblokarch, @ktl_r
Twitter: @fblokarch

Theo's talk was recorded live at PechaKucha Night Winnipeg Vol. 39, on September 5, 2019, at the Park Theatre. 

For more information on PKN Winnipeg, follow us on Twitter (@pkn_winnipeg), Instagram (@pkn_winnipeg), or Facebook (www.facebook.com/pechakuchanightwinnipeg). PKN Winnipeg is presented by the Manitoba Chapter of the Graphic Designers of Canada.

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André Mintz

André Mintz is a visual communicator and artist, as well as founding member of the Marginalia Project, "an art experimentation collective focused on a critical -- but mostly ludic -- approach to new media and new media art." For PechaKucha Night in Lima Vol. 2 he talked about one his projects, a video entitled Paik for Kids. That city's organizer Jules Bay sends in a proper explanation of the piece. In the video Paik for Kids –- made by André Mintz out of family archive -– the electronic image theme is developed from the point of view of the spectator, in the figure of a child being presented by her dad to a TV set that displays the image of the child herself captured by the camera in real-time. It’s not a direct antecessor of Marginalia Project, but a conceptual antecessor, that shows already the problematic with which the project relates to. The relation between body and image -- between one’s self and its representation -- in a gaze that seeks by the naivety the revelation of intrinsic characteristics of the materiality of the image. In a moment in which the video image -- with its specific characteristics, such as its accessibility to a larger amateur public and its simultaneity -- was also in its childhood, with the first explorations of its potentials. By placing the camera framing the image itself produces, the system feeds back itself, multiplying the image it captures ad infinitum, like two mirrors facing each other. It’s a basic procedure of video -- that was impossible in traditional cinema -- used in many works in this field, and that will also be used in marginalia. However, such procedure is quite different from the mirrors, since the body of the spectator is detached from the image formation, allowing her only to perceive it -- as her movement does not make it possible to see anything beyond what the camera sees. The playing of getting into and out of the frame reveals the fragmentation produced by the camera, just as the similarities and distinctions between the body of the spectator and represented body -- between the subjective point of view and the view of the self made objective. Marginalia Project seeks an experience close to this childish one: an exploratory will without a predetermined objective beyond the knowledge offered by the process; in process. The idea as a product of experience; of the direct contact with the materiality from which it elaborates its own form and detonates new processes.

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On Presentations, Powerpoint, PechaKucha

The PechaKucha format was discussed in an article found in last week's MetroActive. The article not only goes over the basics of the PK 20x20 format, but also quotes PKN San Jose organizer and ex-PowerPoint developer/designer Ric Bretschneider, and recaps the their latest, Vol. 11, which was held on May 16: The other breath of fresh air was Tracey Ariga. Her unabashed optimism about accessibility, approachability and transparency concluded with her declaring that she just loves San Jose, plain and simple. Thunderous applause followed. Check out the full article here.    

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My New Everyday Life

“Obviously, living in a wheelchair is a challenge but is a normal life for many. Wheelchair living requires constant mapping out of acceptable routes and services –like bathrooms– and destinations –like restaurants.” In My New Everyday Life Speaker Nora Ames reprises her standing ovation presentation from the Chicago Architecture Biennial at PechaKucha Chicago’s 36th Volume.   Nora used to enjoy runs by Lake Michigan, running by herself or with coworkers and friends. 13 months ago she had a medical condition taking her out of the workplace and changing her perspective forever. In this presentation the effect of design on accessibility is discussed.