PechaKucha Presentation
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Presenter bw marvintate

Marvin Tate

Interdisciplinary Artist and Educator in Chicago

Build Your Own Science

PRESENTED ON DEC 12, 2018
IN CHICAGO @ VOL 48

Marvin Tate is a performance poet, lyricist, published author, collected visual artist and educator. His work references African American history, speaks of personal and family history, and touches upon broader themes of cultural and political segregation, while addressing his own identity.

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How History can be Used

BY BLAINE HUDSON
@ VOL 7 ON FEB 21, 2012

Blaine Hudson lectures about the history and culture of African American in Louisville. The more we know about Black history, the better we can improve it for the future.

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Battle Rap - a History of Ritual Profanity

BY RORY STOBO
@ VOL 1 ON AUG 25, 2015

Did you know that ritual profanity is as old as the hills? Well Rory Stobo does and he practices it in his spare time. Commonly known as Battle Rap, Rory explains what happens during contests, how rappers win and where this gritty, punchy and exhilarating art form is going. 

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Introducing The Kentucky African American Encyclopedia

BY NANCY RICHEY
@ VOL 6 ON OCT 20, 2015

The story of African Americans in Kentucky is as diverse and vibrant as the state's general history. Nancy Richey highlights notable local African Americans who were "firsts" in their locales or fought for civil rights.

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Black in The Day

BY WILLIE SLAYDEN
@ VOL 1 ON OCT 15, 2015

How much do you know about black history? The presenter shares historic moments of American history in relation to how black community members were treated by their white counterparts while also highlighting the assets of a black community in Tulsa Oklahoma.

 

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Building Black Utopias: Modeling the Architectural Principles of African American Literature, 1960-1975

BY CHARLES L. DAVIS, II, PH.D.
@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

"We started with several books that looked at the brownstone as a site of intervention."

In Building Black Utopias: Modeling the Architectural Principles of African American Literature, 1960-1975 from PechaKucha Buffalo vol. 17, Charles L. Davis, II, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Architecture at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, shows works from his recent exhibition project, Building Black Utopias, and discusses the literature that served as inspiration. 

The Building Black Utopias project combines the tools of the architect, the historian and the literary critic to recover the historical contributions of African American writers to architectural utopian thought. It specifically examines the role of literary depictions of place in June Jordan, Amiri Baraka, Paule Marshall and Angela Davis’ writings. Davis argues that each authors’ rhetorical manipulations of the built environment operates on the same level as architectural utopian thought insofar as both mediums created rich, alternative depictions of modernist space to liberate the architect’s imagination. The final exhibit translates the spatial ideas of literature into drawings, models and other ephemera.

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Amazing Black Women Not In Your History Book

BY RAYVEN HOLMES
@ VOL 18 ON MAR 10, 2018

It wasn't until Rayven Holmes was out of school that she discovered on her own that history also included amazing black women, and not just the old white guys that were in the school history books. Here is a small collection of those amazing black women, and why we need to get them included in the history books.

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Preview of National Museum of African American Music

BY RON YEARWOOD
@ VOL 26 ON OCT 18, 2017

Beecher Hicks, III - A look at the future of the National Museum of African American Music in downtown Nashville

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Mane Street

BY RAYVEN HOLMES
@ VOL 19 ON MAY 25, 2018

This is an artistic stroll through black kink. Rayven Holmes shares an enlightening presentation about the styles and the underlying culture of contemporary Black hair styles.

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Little Liberia -- Digital History Project

BY BRANDON TAYLOR
@ VOL 4 ON MAR 21, 2019

Little Liberia was a thriving community made up of Native Americans, African Americans and escaped slaves during the 1850's in Bridgeport, CT. Today the Mary and Eliza Freeman houses remain as evidence of Little Liberia. The National Trust for Historic Preservation has listed the buildings as one of “America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places.” College student, Brandon Taylor, tells the story of his involvement in helping to save this community through his skills as a computer science student.